And… Switch.

It is switch it up day again.

I still hate changeover days.  I don’t like the unknown of going to a new rotation.  I dislike finding new offices, sorting out times to go to new clinics and all that stuff.  The unknown kind of sucks.

I was really sad to leave Peds Onc.  Minus my episode of semi-depression after the first week and a half, it has been a fabulous rotation.  Kids and Oncology… Not much else more to love!  At least to me as an Oncology resident who not-so-secretly sometimes wonders if Peds is the place for her.

Seriously, it was a great rotation.  I learned how to do cool things like lumbar punctures (poking needles in spines… and administering chemo) and bone marrow biopsies.  And I don’t even like procedures, but those are similar to taking blood and I do get strange kicks out of taking blood.  I learned a ton about kids cancer and chemo drugs and such.  But the bigger piece is that I got to know some super awesome families and play with some fabulous kids.  I actually followed some kids almost weekly in clinic, and a few of them I followed from diagnosis as an inpatient.  In the world of a resident where you are forever darting in and out of services, that kind of consistency is pretty exciting.

Now, I am off to Family Medicine.

My Dad that I should get a by and not have to do it given the med school I went to.  Not so much.  But it is true, I have already done over 12 weeks of Family Med and another 4 of general community Internal Medicine (which in some contexts is still a lot of primary care).  That makes me feel prepared for the rotation, at least.

Family as a med student was one of my best and one of my more liked rotations, but part of that was the doc I worked with was a person I got along with famously.  It helps.

My orientation was good.  The clinic is nice.  I am fascinated by the electronic medical record.  It will be my first time using one in a non-hospital setting.  I am intrigued because I am very pro-EMR (seriously, I wrote a whole health systems paper on them during undergrad).

I start with my first patients tomorrow in clinic.  Whoo.  I find the hardest part is figuring out what people want and what things I need to review and what things I need supervision for.  It seems everyone is different, so it is always a process.

The thing I am most angsty about is that the service also covers their own obstetrics.  Although this isn’t the main thing I am supposed to be doing, I may have to go to a few deliveries (so not my thing), although I will be thrilled to do some prenatal visits (my favourite thing after seniors and babies).

Such is the adventure of new rotation.  You take the good with the bad and figure the rest out as it goes.

This is rotation number 12 of residency.  Our physics exam is at the end of the month, then we are done that for the “year.”  I will no longer be a PGY 1 in just two months (eep).  It is crazy how this stuff flies by.

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2 thoughts on “And… Switch.

  1. That seems like a lot of rotations for your first year! Is that typically normal of other residencies? It’s great that you get so much exposure to so many different specialities. Hopefully the EMR lives up to your expectations in a non-hospital setting!

    • A lot of programs have the year broken into 4 week blocks… 13 per year. I think it depends on the program and how far along you are how many different rotations happen. I did 2 two month rotations for a total of what will be11 different rotations in first year. Many programs require some sort of rotating internship, so it seems like maybe 8-10 in first year is normal. Later on, you spend longer in places, so 4-10 seems to be more common, but it is very program dependent.

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