How Did That Happen?: How to overwhelm the pulp out of a new resident

I have been off my blogging game.

I blame starting core Rad Onc.  I keep staying late and studying at night and all of that stuff.  Funny how when you are doing something you actually love you tend to work more.

I also blame summer.  The nice weather nights have us out and about meeting up with friends.  Last night, we had a hymn sing at the nursing home we volunteer at with our small group and then went out for ice cream.  Tonight was coffee with a couple we know from back home who recently moved here.  So awesome.

I am a week overdue on a How Did That Happen? post.  So, that is what you shall receive.  stethoscopes1

I have been spending my last week orienting and mentoring our new, delightful R1.  My How Did That Happen? is how to overwhelm the pulp out of a new resident (in case you didn’t already know).

**Note: This is kind of sarcastic and based on things that really do happen.  There are some things I think administration and faculty can do better with.  There are some things that I can’t see solutions to… Just facts of starting new jobs.

  • First of all… DON’T OVERWHELM THEM.  This is my for real advice.  This will fail.  Starting residency at baseline is kind of overwhelming.  But, bits of information at a time and having someone available as help and back-up is better than just slamming it all in a book or presentation at once.
  • Have multiple giant orientation sessions for the incoming residents from the university, the hospital.  Fill them with tons of information that is both useful and useless intermixed with facts about failures, crying and patients dying.  Make sure that it is unclear what is useful or useless and make it seem like terrible things will happen.
  • Make sure to start them on call the first day or so of residency.  Nothing is better than really starting out with a bang.
  • Send out various passwords and user IDs to different email accounts and expect the person to sort them out themselves.
  • Have a very not user friendly computer system with a million different log-ons, passwords and variations.  Review these in orientations, but don’t do any practical training, that would be too helpful.
  • Use four digit paging in a hospital where you have to dial 7 numbers that can differ between sites.  Expect new person to call you back promptly.
  • Let new people loose in the hospital without giving a tour. 
  • Take the new person a tour on a hot day after a full day of orientation to show them everything.  Realize that they will remember very little of this.  Do it anyway.
  • Leave them to figure out everything on their own.
  • Tell them all of your call horror stories.
  • Take them to visit the ward.  Show them where everything is.  Show them the charts.  Talk about writing notes, finding computers and how the rooms are organized.  Introduce them to the all of the staff on the ward who promptly start asking who they are looking after. 
  • Go to a session about how to use an EMR only for the radiation oncology patients and for radiation planning.  Use technical terms just to really keep them on their toes.
  • Give them the sickest patients. 
  • Ask them to read around everything they saw that day.  The list of topics totals a page.  Oh, and review the clinic charts for tomorrow too.  Hope you can work the disconnected computer systems!
  • Talk to them about booking vacation.  That is months away.  On rotations that “you just need to take vacation from.”
  • Tell them you are so glad to be done intern year, it really does get better (this can be good… it can also instil fear of what is yet to come).
  • Try to tell them everything they need to know ever in one day.  Or at least make them think that is what is happening.

 

What things happened to you that overwhelmed you as a new resident or med student or employee in general?

 

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