Work in the midst of call

This weekend, amidst all of my call-y goodness, I am trying to get some work done on a few upcoming projects/presentations.

I have a journal club a week from Tuesday, so I picked some articles.  Head and neck cancer supportive care.  Look out world.  I’m about to critique the pulp out of an article on prophylactic versus reactive feeding tubes and hemoglobin levels and transfusions in head and neck folks.

And then, I spent a bunch of time looking into stuff for career day.  Every year, I help out with career day.  And every year, I say we will make it better next year.  You see, Rad Onc, much like me in high school, is kind of one of the nerdier, quiet and obscure specialties out there.  As a result, most people walk right past our booth.  Seriously.  You should see them all flock to the surgical simulators and fake airways at Gen Surg or Anesthesia.  And everyone wants to know how much the Radiologists make to sit in a dark room.  But, the Rad Onc folks.  They have creepy masks and a powerpoint.

Image from ebroc.com.

Not this year.  Okay, we will still have creepy masks and a powerpoint running.  That is who we are.  But this year, I am cracking out some YouTube videos of some of the “cooler” aspects (that’s right… big machines and computer animations).

They are cool to me.  And at least they give people something to ask questions about.

Plus, I think I have found an online application that we can use to make ourselves “interactive.”  A try your hand at contouring station, perhaps.

I know, not as cool as intubating a dummy.  But, maybe we’ll get to tell another couple people who we really are.

I just have to get approval from the powers that be (and acquire the technology to make it all happen).

Today I decided to clean out my email inbox instead of starting to actually work on the journal club.  Because that is just too much energy.

I got about 2 minutes in when I realized something.  I have something like 30+ One45 emails.

For those of you in the world who don’t use One45, it is an online evaluation system people in the medicine world love.  And we evaluate every single flipping session we ever attend.  And get evaluated almost as often.

Image from imerrill.umd.edu.

Usually, I’m on top of those things.  I hammer them out once a week or so.

The last two months or so, not so much.

I know what I’m doing this evening.  It involves a likert scale, good music and trying to reach back into the recesses of my memory.

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